Dr. Timothy Sharobem

Contact

Education

  • B.S. Chemical Engineering, Minor in Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, May 2008
  • B.S. Chemistry, 3-2 Engineering Combined Plan Program, Fordham University, Bronx, NY, May 2008

 Awards

  • M. Dimitri Hassialis Fellowship, Columbia University, School of Engineering and Applied Science, 2012
  • National Science Foundation (NSF) IGERT Fellowship, concentration in soft materials, 2009

 Teaching Experience

  • Course Manager- Columbia University, Columbia Video Network (CVN)
    • CHEE 4500, Corrosion of Metals
  • Teaching Assistant- Columbia University, School of Engineering and Applied Science
    • EAEE 3800, 3801 Earth and Environmental Engineering Laboratory I and II
    • CHEE 4500, Corrosion of Metals

Research Communications

  • T. Sharobem; M.J. Castaldi, P.F. Duby: “The Effect of the SO2:HCl ratio on active oxidation of WTE Superheater Materials,” Oral presentation, 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers, AIChE Annual Meeting Pittsburgh, PA.
  • T. Sharobem; M.J. Castaldi; P.F. Duby:  “The Effect of SO2:HCl Ratio on Superheater High Temperature Corrosion,” Proceedings of the 2012 North American Waste-to-Energy Conference, NAWTEC20, Portland, Maine.
  • T. Sharobem; M.J. Castaldi; P.F. Duby:  “The Effect of SO2/HCl Ratio on Superheater High Temperature Corrosion,” Oral Presentation, 2012 North American Waste-to-Energy Conference, NAWTEC20, Portland, Maine.
  • T. Sharobem; M.J. Castaldi; P.F. Duby:  “High Temperature Corrosion of Low Carbon Steel Under Various SO2/HCl Ratios,” 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Research Interests

My research focuses on determining and understanding the corrosion of materials which are used for high temperature applications—specifically thermal treatment processes (i.e. combustion and gasification) of municipal solid wastes (MSW). My experimental work has thus far been focused on the corrosion of metals which can be used in superheaters of MSW incineration plants, in particular the interaction of sulfur and chlorine compounds.

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